About Writers On Reading

Welcome to Writers on Reading! You can expect a great author interview every Friday. Plus some fun drawing giveaways you won't want to miss during the month of June! So make sure you enter! Click here for scheduled interviews. Our goal is to present the books writers love, so through their interviews, you can get to know writers as readers too. (And hopefully find new favorites!) I remember a special thrill whenever I heard my favorite writers loved the writers I loved. Here, I hope you'll share my delight of discovery. I am arranging interviews and will soon be listing upcoming guests. If you have a question you'd like asked, or if you'd like to be guest, please use the contact form below. Thanks for visiting!

Friday, 15 July 2016

Writer Cathy West On Reading

Cathy, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your most recent novel, The Things We Knew, released mere days ago. I’m curious…as a reader are you drawn toward certain genres? Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

I love to read books similar to the ones I write. I enjoy large family dramas, romance, and some historical fiction. The books I choose to read will usually be more along the lines of women’s fiction – I need to connect with the characters and feel as though I am on the journey along with them – so anything where a character has a struggle to go through or some major drama going on – all those kinds of stories will immediately capture my attention. I love romance, so if I can find a great romance story that takes my breath away, that works. Romantic comedy is great too, but lately I find myself reading books from Kate Morton, Sue Meissner, Kristin Hannah – I enjoy novels where there is both a historical and contemporary setting – Sue Meissner does that very well.


Having published so many books do you find time to read during the months you spend writing or with deadlines ahead is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?

I do read a bit while I’m writing, as it’s good to have that mental break. Although I have to really turn off my internal editor and just enjoy the book, which is why I’m very picky about what I read! Sometimes it doesn’t work out well because if I read a very fabulous book, I start thinking the one I’m writing is absolute rubbish. J Sometimes I do have to read while I’m writing/editing if I’m asked to read for endorsement, but of course those books are usually great so it’s always a pleasure to do that. I did give myself 50 books to read by the end of 2016 in the GoodReads Challenge, but I’m only at 20 right now, so it’s not looking good! I think I overshot that estimation. J


Did a book recently make you laugh/cry/sigh/shiver?

I love Jojo Moyes and I know pretty much all her books will make me laugh and cry. I haven’t read one yet that hasn’t. Kate Atkinson is another ABA author who always makes me laugh, she has a great dry wit and her characters always seem to possess a delightful edge of sarcasm, which I love. J Recently, Kara Isaac’s Close To You, made me laugh, and Kristy’s RingMaster’s Wife made me cry. Also, my own book, The Memory of You, which releases in March 2017, has some sad scenes in it, and since I just finished editing that one, I will admit to still crying through those scenes. J



Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

I loved reading from the moment I learned how! I’m not sure what I read first! Being raised in the British school system, I read all of Enid Blyton’s novels. I loved Nancy Drew. My mother was a big Agatha Christie fan so I read those as well. The first really ‘big’ book I read was Gone With The Wind. I was 13, and I remember how heavy it was! I couldn’t wait to get back into it every day.

When did you know you wanted to write? Did any or multiple books influence this desire?

I don’t think I had a specific moment when I knew I wanted to write. Creating stories was something that just seemed to come naturally and I enjoyed it. In my teens I would write books in my school binders! I wrote my first full-length novel in my early 20’s, and I think it was at that point I really thought that writing was something I’d enjoy doing for a living. Although back then I didn’t know the first thing about how to get published – I had lots to learn!


With a hot summer upon us, what is on your summer to-read list? And what is your ideal summer reading experience?

I read pretty widely in both CBA and ABA. There are amazing books coming out of CBA right now – I just finished Kristy Cambron’s latest, The Ringmaster’s Wife – she is one great historical author, I love all her books! Beth Vogt’s new release, Almost Like Being In Love is also great, and Kara Isaac’s Close to You is wonderful! I’m currently reading The Nightingale, by Kristin Hannah. I have a few more books on my summer reading list, new releases by Billy Coffey andJim Rubart, and a couple of older novels by Kate Atkinson, I love all her books too! I’ll usually curl up outside in the shade with my iPad, or if it’s too hot, you’ll find me inside on the couch with the a/c on!

Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?

I love the classics. My son lives in Boston, and when my husband and I visit, we always go to Brattle Books, which is an amazing three story building filled with old books! We’ve found some great collections there – Dickens, Jane Austen. Our most recent purchase was one of the early versions of Peter Pan – Wendy and Peter – so I’m really looking forward to re-reading that one. I try to read Pride and Prejudice every year as well, just because I love it so much!


Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Cathy! Folks, you can continue to connect with Cathy—and find out more about her books!—at the links below.

BIO:

INSPY Award-winning author Catherine West writes stories of hope and healing from her island home in Bermuda. When she’s not at the computer working on her next story, you can find her taking her Border Collie for long walks or reading books by her favorite authors. She and her husband have two grown children. Catherine’s novel, Bridge of Faith, won the 2015 Grace Award. Her new novel, The Things We Knew, releases July 12th, 2016, through Harper Collins Christian Publishing.
Catherine loves to connect with her readers and can be reached at Catherine@catherinejwest.com

PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:





Friday, 8 July 2016

Writer Renee Blare On Reading

Renee, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your most recent novel, Through Raging Waters, released this month. I’m curious…as a reader are you drawn toward certain genres? Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

I love to read suspense, but believe it or not, my favorite is historical romance! I don’t write it, but I love to read it. J I also like time travel. I’m a bit of a sci-fi nut. LOL

That’s fun to know! As a writer, you should know better, but as a reader, you know we all do it…so, when did you last “judge a book by the cover”? How did it work out?

I bought a “cool” book off Amazon a few months back. At least it looked good. Nice cover, rather good sounding blurb. I read the first chapter and tossed it. Bad editing (if at all) made it hard to read, profanity…not my cup of tea. I guess you really can’t judge a book by its cover.

So true! Having published so many books do you find time to read during the months you spend writing or with deadlines ahead is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?

I deliberately put one review per month into my blog schedule so I wouldn’t lose my reading. Yes, I catch myself doing it as an “obligation” sometimes, but I try to pick books or genres that I like. It helps that I’m rather eclectic in my reading tastes so I can read almost anything (except horror – shudder.)

Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

Yep. I’d stay up to all hours of the night reading, if not ALL night long! I actually rewrote the book, Airport by Arthur Hailey. I was a bit dyslexic and my tutors recommended writing…physically writing. It was hard but it helped.

With a hot summer upon us, what is on your summer to-read list? And what is your ideal summer reading experience?

I actually love to read while we’re fishing. Sitting next to one of our high mountain lakes is the absolute best! I can relax in the summer sun with a cool breeze to my face. I just need to be careful not to get sunburned!

Oh, what a delightful way to let readers get to know you. Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Renee! Folks, you can continue to connect with Renee—and find out more about his/her books!—at the links below, but first, Through Raging Waters Back Blurb:

Through Raging Waters
Back Blurb:

If Mother Nature has her way, Timber Springs will never be the same...

A warm spring and early rainstorms melt the snowpack. Spring runoff compounded by the storm of the century sends Timber Springs into a tailspin.
Tossed into the role of rescuer, local pharmacist Paul Fitzgerald must face his past before the whole world falls apart. While he fights to contain the beast around him, he finds his steadfast control slipping through his fingers. And life…everyone’s life…hangs by a thread once again.
She isn’t a hero. Melissa Hampton has her own demons to battle. After she learns of her mysterious beginnings amidst her mother’s keepsakes, she faces more than just the river rushing outside her door. Now, she must discern friend from foe…but as waters rise and tension climbs within Timber Springs, she needs to rise to the challenge or lose the only man she's ever loved.

Can two people find each other through raging waters?



Renee Blare Bio:
Raised in Louisiana and Wyoming, Renee started writing poetry in junior high school. After having her son, a desire to attend pharmacy school sent her small family to the University of Wyoming in Laramie, and she's been counting pills ever since. While writing's her first love, well, after the Lord and husband, she also likes to fish and hunt as well as pick away on her classical guitar.
Nestled in the foothills of the Wind River Mountains with her husband, crazy dogs and ornery cat, she continues to serve her community as a pharmacist while penning her Christian stories any chance she can get. She loves to interact with readers and invites you check out her website, blog, and social media.


Friday, 15 April 2016

Writer Christine Lindsay On Reading

Christine, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your most recent novel, Sofi’s Bridge, releases in a few weeks and seems to fit perfectly with your previous accomplishments. With several historical novels to your credit, I’d love to know about your reading habits! So…as a reader are you drawn toward certain genres? Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

Oh yes!!!  I used to be drawn to historicals and as a teen to gothic historicals, but lately my tastes have changed to those books that braid present day with the past. As a grandma nowadays it’s fun to look back on my life and see things from this perspective. I love books that do the same, show me how life in the past affects families today, especially if old secrets are revealed, if family healing has come, and old hurts find forgiveness and new beginnings. I’ve really enjoyed the author Kate Morton for this. She doesn’t write in the Christian genre, but her writing is amazing.

Another author I’ve enjoy is Linda Nichols. She didn’t write historicals or braided
stories, but I love her storytelling. She is in the Christian genre and has beautiful spiritual takeaways.

Having published so many books do you find time to read during the months you spend writing or with deadlines ahead is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?

I find that is just isn’t possible to be a good writer without reading. Especially if I’m stressed with a deadline looming, nothing helps better than snuggling up on the couch or in bed with a good novel. I can’t remember what I read while writing Sofi’s Bridge, but while writing my current work I’ve been reading the secular Canadian and New York Best-selling author Susanna Kearsley. While I do not get any spiritual takeaways from Kearsley’s books I enjoy the braiding of the past and present day.

I’d like to see more of this style in Christian fiction, and it’s my aim to be one of those authors that offers that. As for Christian authors, I really enjoyed Jack Cavanaugh’s Songs of the Night series.

Ohhh, I have his books, but haven’t gotten around to reading them! Now, I’ll have to. What was the last book you absolutely couldn't put down? Why?

Kate Morton’s The Lake House. The writing was superb, no wonder she is an international best seller, and she kept me guessing about the family mystery almost to the very end. As a connoisseur of mystery novels and BBC cozy mysteries I am not easy to fool, but by jove she did it. It’s that kind of quality that gives me the shivers; I just love excellent writing.


Great recommend. Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

I devoured books as a child and teen. My mother read to me a great deal when I was very young, such as the book Heidi. The first books I remember reading by myself were What Katie Did and What Katie Did Next.

When did you know you wanted to write? Did any or multiple books influence this desire?

My writing journey began during and after a difficult time in my life. In 1979 I was an unwed mother and I relinquished my baby girl to adoption. I wanted her to have a loving dad as well as a mom, and being unmarried I couldn’t give her that. Twenty years later, my birthdaughter and I were reunited, but the reunion was much more traumatic than I had anticipated. As I was reliving the original loss of my first child, my husband gave me a brand new journal and pen, and said, “Here honey, write it.”

A few years later I felt the Lord encourage me to put the spiritual and emotional healing I had received into Christian fiction with the goal of encouraging others in their heart aches.

I have loved stories all my life—secular and Christian—and receive much joy from escaping into the worlds of novels. So God in His sweetness has enabled me to use the types of stories I love to help others believe in a happy ending in their life through Jesus Christ.


Wow! What a beautiful journey and mission. With spring just sprung upon us, what is on your to-read list? And what is your ideal spring reading experience?

My TBR list includes more of Susanna Kearsley and Davis Bunn. I am so looking forward to warmer days when I can sit out in my back garden, lie back on the chaise lounge with a good book, a cup of tea at my side, our two dogs lolling about on the grass, and my cat Scottie soaking up the rays of sunshine on the patio below my chair. Sounds like utter bliss to me. During the springtime my garden is full of clematis, tulips, daffodils, poppies, peonies, and forget-me-knots.

Sounds like a beautiful experience! Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?

There is a pile of books that I refer to as my old friends. I re-read these books every few years: Here are my best pals:  Far Pavilions, Shadow of the Moon by MM Kaye, A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute, The Ivy Tree by Mary Stewart, and now the books by Kate Morton and Susanna Kearsley. I apologize that these books are not from the Christian genre, but they are simply excellent storytelling.


No apology necessary! Great books are great books. Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Christine! Folks, you can continue to connect with Christine—and find out more about his/her books!—at the links below.

BIO: Christine Lindsay is the author of multi-award-winning Christian fiction. Born in N. Ireland, it was tales of her ancestors who served in the British Cavalry in Colonial India that inspired her historical trilogy, Book 1 Shadowed in Silk, Book 2 Captured by Moonlight, and the explosive finale Veiled at Midnight. Her Irish wit and joy in the use of setting as a character is evident in her contemporary romance Londonderry Dreaming and in Sofi’s Bridge coming May 2016.
Aside from being a busy writer and speaker, Christine is the happy wife of David of 35 years, a mom and a grandma. She makes her home on the west coast of Canada, and in Aug. 2016 she will see her long-awaited non-fiction book released, Finding Sarah, Finding Me: A Birth Mother’s Story.

PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:
www.ChristineLindsay.org or follow her on Amazon on Twitter. Subscribe to her quarterly newsletter, and be her friend on Pinterest , Facebook, and  Goodreads



Friday, 1 April 2016

Writer Clarice James On Reading

Clarice, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your debut novel, Double Header, released mere months ago. Since you’re a Contemporary Women’s Fiction writer, I’m curious…as a reader are you drawn toward certain genres?

I am drawn to contemporary women’s fiction, but also love a good historical or classic. Of course, many of the books in my library are non-fiction, including topics on spiritual growth, devotionals, biblical reference, and even marketing and business.

Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a reader?

The themes that resonate with me are often ones I’ve personally experienced: fighting God and finding Christ; new love after widowhood; letting go of control to experience God’s best for me; and finding God’s purpose for our life.

Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

I don’t want the book to be so shallow that I can’t learn from the story yet so deep that I get lost.

What was the most out-of-character book you’ve recently read, and what led to your choice?

Recently, I read Out of the Storm (HopeSprings Books, 2015), an anthology of short stories, many of which were speculative fiction, which is not a genre I am drawn to. Yet I enjoyed many of those very stories. My choice to read this book was due to one particular story: "Just West of Clovis," a western by Ralph D. James, who happens to be my husband. It won first place in its category.

As a writer, you should know better, but as a reader, you know we all do it…so, when did you last “judge a book by the cover”? How did it work out?

A few years back, I read a romance novel—not usually my first choice. But the history and writing were so good I’ve recommended it over and over--The Chamomile by Susan F. Craft (Heritage Beacon Fiction, 2013). Sometimes in historical stories, the researched parts are obvious. But Susan’s stories read like she lived during the revolutionary war days.

As a writer working on her third novel, do you find time to read?

I find pockets of time to read because I enjoy good stories, love learning from other writers, and find it relaxing.

So, what did you read while working on your last book?

I was a beta reader for Terrie Todd’s The Silver Suitcase (Waterfall Press 2016). It was excellent!

What was the last book you absolutely couldn't put down? Why?

It was a western titled West for the Black Hills by Peter Leavell (Mountainview Books LLC, 2015). He had so much conflict and tension in his story, it made it hard to stop reading! I can’t wait to get the next book in the series.

When did you know you wanted to write? Did any or multiple books influence this desire?

I had a high school teacher who was also the drama coach. His love of good books and his dramatic flair made writing seem fun, important, and worthy of my time. (Besides, I wasn’t an athlete and I couldn’t carry a tune.)

With a spring just sprung upon us, what is on your to-read list? And what is your ideal spring reading experience?

I want to read Cynthia Ruchti’s Song of Silence (Abington Press, 2016). When I read Cynthia’s books, I feel like I’m home. My front porch chairs aren’t out yet (still cold in New Hampshire), but it’s a quiet and bright spot to read. Then there’s always my big fat comfy reading chair in the living room in the evenings.

Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?

Les Miserables by Victor Hugo. It’s my all-time favorite.

If Casey Gallagher, the protagonist in Double Header, were to pick a book from today’s shelves, what do you think it would be?


Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Clarice! Folks, you can continue to connect with Clarice—and find out more about her books!—at the links below.

BIO:  Clarice G. James loves to read and write smart, fun, relatable contemporary women’s fiction. After many years of writing and editing for business and ministry, she now enjoys the freedom that writing fiction allows her. Clarice has been a follower of Jesus Christ for over 35 years. She and her husband live in Southern New Hampshire. Together they have five married children and ten grandchildren. Double Header is her first published novel. It was one of three winners in the 2014 Jerry Jenkins Writers Guild Operation First Novel contest.

PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:

Since Mountainview Books LLC is a traditional publisher with a distribution source, you can request Double Header, at your local bookstore. If you’re in a hurry, there’s always online ordering at Barnes & Noble or Amazon.





Friday, 25 March 2016

Writers On Reading Closed for Today

Hello All, No post this Friday---Good Friday. May all of you have a blessed weekend! Here's what I'll be reading and recommending this Easter weekend. :0

Friday, 18 March 2016

Writer Marilyn Turk On Reading

Marilyn, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your debut novel, The Gilded Curse, released mere days ago and looks sumptuous. I’m curious…as a reader are you drawn toward the genre you read in? Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

I love historical fiction, especially Civil War era books, but I read all historical eras.

Good choices! What was the most out-of-character book you’ve recently read, and what led to your choice?
A contemporary suspense, whodunit. I don’t like to read about murders, but I try to choose a variety for my book club, because they don’t all like historical and some like more contemporary suspense or mystery, so I try to stretch my reading selection.

As a writer, you should know better, but as a reader, you know we all do it…so, when did you last “judge a book by the cover”? How did it work out?

Probably Lisa Wingate’s book, The Story Keeper, which I enjoyed immensely and bought her next book as a result.

Do you find time to read during the months you spend writing or with deadlines ahead is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?

I always have a book that I’m reading. I think it helps keep my mind in gear.

What was the last book you absolutely couldn't put down? Why?

The Sea Keeper’s Daughters by Lisa Wingate. I like the way she combines historical with contemporary so I have two story lines to keep up with.

Did a book recently make you laugh/cry/sigh/shiver?

Well, I just read Esther, by Angela Hunt, and it made me shiver because of the
horrific things that people did to people during that time period in Persia.
I cried when I read Dan Walsh’s book, Rescuing Finley – it’s a sweet story.
And I laughed when I read Wonderland Creek by Lynn Austin and also laughed when I read Promises to Keep by Ann Tatlock – both books I loved.

Thanks for the great recommendations! Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

As a preteen I read Nancy Drew and loved those books.

When did you know you wanted to write? Did any or multiple books influence this desire?

I’ve wanted to write devotionals for a long time because I like reading them. I suppose my writing style is a combination of Nancy Drew and historical because I read a few historicals as an older teen, such as The Silver Chalice, Captain from Castille, and Ramona.

With a spring just sprung upon us, what is on your to-read list? And what is your ideal spring reading experience?

I love to read sitting under an umbrella at the beach. That’s got to be my most favorite setting. Fortunately for me, the beach isn’t far away, but with family responsibilities, I often don’t have that leisure. I’m looking forward to reading Once Beyond a Time by Ann Tatlock and The Inn at Ocean’s Edge by Colleen Coble.

Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?

No. Not enough time to reread with all the books I want to read.

If the antagonist/protagonist in one of your books were to pick a book from today’s shelves, what do you think it would be?

That’s a hard one to answer. I think I’ll pass on this one.

Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Marilyn! Folks, you can continue to connect with Marilyn Turk—and find out more about his/her books!—at the links below.

BIO:
Marilyn Turk Bio
Marilyn Turk has been published in Guideposts magazine, Guideposts books - A Joyful Heart and A Cup of Christmas Cheer, The Upper Room, Clubhouse Jr. Magazine, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and Lighthouse Digest magazine. Her book, Lighthouse Devotions was published in 2015, and The Gilded Curse, a historical suspense novel, was released this month. Her weekly lighthouse blog can be found at http://pathwayheart.com. She lives in Florida with husband Chuck and enjoys boating, fishing, tennis, and gardening when she’s not climbing lighthouses or playing with her grandsons.

PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:
Blurb 
In 1942, Lexie Smithfield becomes the only heir to her family’s dwindling fortune after her brother is killed at Pearl Harbor. A mysterious telegram beckons her back to Jekyll Island. Ten years before, the family quit coming to the exclusive Millionaire’s Club after tragic events convinced her mother the island was cursed. Club Superintendent Russell Thompson knows the truth, but he swore never to tell. Will he and Lexie discover the real danger before it’s too late?






Friday, 11 March 2016

Writer Glenn Haggerty On Reading

Glenn, welcome to Writers on Reading! Your MG/YA, book Run, released last October. I had

the delight of reading the first pages in a contest last year and am thrilled to see this now available to readers. I’m curious over what you read. Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

Courage and resourcefulness to overcome physical danger, if well done, usually snags my attention. I like a relatable, imperfect character who somehow finds faith/hope and the grace to overcome.

Yes, that makes for excellent reading! What was the most out-of-character book you’ve recently read, and what led to your choice?

The Jerk Magnet by Melody Carlson. I’m not normally into teen girl romantic problem situations—but I review Christian fiction for tweens and teens, and the title grabbed my attention. This book is intriguing, a frumpy nerd is transformed by her new step mom into this hot chick, who turns out to become—well—a jerk magnet. The transformation like, What Not to Wear, plus, plus was educational, and the character transformation was likewise intriguing. And the author’s portrayal of teen guys was IMO pretty much right on.

Okay, I’m intrigued. Sounds like a fun book. As a writer, you should know better, but as a reader, you know we all do it…so, when did you last “judge a book by the cover”? How did it work out?

Robot Wars, Death Trap by Sigmund Brouwer. I really didn’t like the cover, but inside was an interesting sci-fi concept that the 2015 movie, The Martian echos (I think). It was well done with great character development as well.

Do you find time to read during the months you spend writing or with deadlines ahead is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?

I like to read at night before I go to bed. Actually due to my visual impairment, I don’t actually read but listen. I usually have two books on hand. One, an exciting (hopefully) current YA/MG title or just about any westerns, then when I really need to actually sleep, I switch to a boring historical. I’m thankful for the auto 5-15-minute-turnoff-function because those usually put me right to sleep.

Hah! That’s fun. (And I can say even though there’s nothing I’d rather read than a good history book, lol.) What was the last book you absolutely couldn't put down? Why?

Recently, Waterfall by Lisa Bergren. Interesting historical/fantasy, great character and action, and I was just wondering how the protagonist would extricate herself from the delightful mess.

Another excellent recommend. Uh-oh, this interview is going to be just terrible for my to-read list! I don’t think I want to ask, but…did a book recently make you laugh/cry/sigh/shiver?

I mentioned this on my website, but Jack Staples and the Ring of Time by Mark Batterson and Joel N. Clark, with vivid Biblical analogies excited me spiritually, reminded me of the reality of the deadly spiritual battle that rages around me everyday. Similarly, I too want to excite and encourage my readers spiritually while providing such intense entertainment.

Good for it—and good for you! Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

Yes. I got hooked on reading in sixth grade. Somehow I found myself in the library and picked up a copy of Jack London’s Call of the Wild . . . The rest is history.

When did you know you wanted to write? Did any or multiple books influence this desire?

C.S. Lewis dazzled me with his Christian allegories, but his genius was too high to encourage me to move in that direction. I think Bodie Thoene’s Zion Chronicles and Zion Covenant teased my interest in Christian historical and action adventure. But I didn’t really think writing might be in God’s plan for me until sometime after I became disabled as a result of complications of Glaucoma surgery in 1995. After years of rehabilitation and additional schooling, I dove into writing in late 2006-7.

And I’m so glad you did! BTW, Bodie Thoene is my favorite modern author, the author who first incited my respect for the Christian Ficiton genre all those decades ago! So, now I know I just have to add all the books you’ve recommended, including yours, to my reading list! Has any book stuck with you recently? What created the lasting impressions?

I reread much of Experiencing God by Henry Blackaby in January, and it encouraged me yet again to draw close to God and join Him in His amazing adventure that lays before me each and every day!

With a cozy winter upon, what is on your to-read list? And what is your ideal autumn reading experience?

Okay how about Spring! J. I’m actually looking forward to writing my third novel in my Intense series. Working title, Hyde, and it’s about modern day pirates, buried treasure. There’s murder and kidnapping in the mix and a thorny teen problem to dive into. I get excited thinking about it!

You’ll have to let us know when it’s available! Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?

So many new books to read, I can’t think of a fiction that I’d reread instead of something new at this point.

If the antagonist/protagonist in one of your books were to pick a book from today’s shelves, what do you think it would be?

Thirteen-year-old Tyler would definitely pick up Back Before Dark by Tim Shoemaker, The Last Thing I Remember by Andrew Klavan, or one of Eddie Jones Caden’s Chronicles.

Those sound like perfect fits! What a fun interview. Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Glenn! Folks, you can continue to connect with Glenn Haggerty—and find out more about Run and any of his upcoming, intense MG/YA books!—at the links below.

BIO:
Glenn is a member of ACFW (American Christian Fiction Writers), a graduate of Vision Loss Resources and Bethel Seminary, father of six and grandfather of six. He likes tandem biking and kayaking, and lives in Minneapolis with his wife and two youngest college age children. Glenn is also an award-winning author who combines his love for teaching God’s word with his passion for writing exciting fiction. Run is his first novel.

Twitter, @grhaggertyjr
Blog(Youth Book Reviews): www.christianbooksfortweensandteens.com

PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:
Purchase links:
B&N


Monday, 7 March 2016

Writer Henry McLaughlin On Reading

Henry, welcome to Writers On Reading! Your most recent book,

Riverbend Justice: Book 2 in the Riverbend Sagas, released at the beginning of this year. These look like such great Western books, so I’m excited to get your opinions and recommendations! Finding good Westerns—real westerns—like yours is hard. Aside from Louis L’amour and Zane Grey…what have you found to interest you?







My favorite Western writer is Elmer Kelton. His stories are historically accurate. His characters are real and intriguing. He has the ability to put the reader in the saddle with the main character and keep him there. And he explores stories not usually done by other writers. Among my favorites are Buffalo Soldiers, Llano River, The Good Old Boys, The Time It Never Rained, and The Day the Cowboys Quit.

What was the most out-of-character book you’ve recently read, and what led to your choice?



Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay. It was recommended by Donald Maass in a writing workshop as an excellent example of keeping secrets. And it is. Even more, it is also a fascinating story about the Holocaust in France and one journalist’s efforts to tell the whole story 60 years later and the layers of family secrets she unveils. I highly recommend it as a story to read for its value as a story. And the craft displayed is subtly awesome.



Wow that is a recommendation—and does sound out-of-character for you! When you are writing, do you find time to read? Is it either/or for you? If so, what did you read while working on your last book? If not, what did you read when you finished this one?



I’m always reading at least two books, one non-fiction and one novel in addition to magazines etc. Reading is my favorite leisure activity. I recently completed a fantasy series. While I was working on it, I read a lot of fantasy. I wanted to immerse myself in the genre and learn from the best, so I read a lot of Orson Scott Card and Terry Pratchett, among others.




Sounds like a series we can look forward to. Were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?




Yes, I was one of those kids who always had his nose in a book. The book that had the greatest impact on me was The Black Stallion by Walter Farley. I loved how it took me deep into new worlds. It’s probably the book that planted the seed to be a writer when I grew up. Now I’m a writer, but I haven’t grown up yet. Don’t plan on it either.




Hah! Fun stuff. With a chilling winter just starting to let up, what is on your to-read list? And what is your ideal cozy reading experience?




I’m looking forward to reading Jacqueline Winspear’s next Maisie Dobbs novel, Journey to Munich.




Is there a book you are looking forward to rereading?




Books by Elizabeth George and Jacqueline Winspear are always interesting rereads as is Orson Scott Card. Specific titles I will probably re-read this year are The Book Thief  and Sarah’s Key.




Thanks so much for visiting, Henry, and letting us get to know you better as a reader. Folks, you may connect with Henry and discover more about his books at the following links.


BIO:



Tagged as “one to watch” by Publishers Weekly, award winning author Henry McLaughlin takes his readers on adventures into the hearts and souls of his characters as they battle inner conflicts while seeking to bring restoration and justice in a dark world. His writing explores these themes of restoration, reconciliation and redemption


His debut novel, Journey to Riverbend, won the Operation First Novel award sponsored by the Christian Writers Guild and was published by Tyndale House.


Henry has a life-long love for history and the American West and the stories of the people who lived there. In his fiction, he seeks to bring their adventures to life, to show the struggles and triumphs over man and nature that helped build a strong people.


Henry and his wife of nearly fifty years live in North Texas. From this home, they enjoy their church, their friends and traveling, especially to visit their far-flung family.


Besides his writing, Henry treasures working with other writers and helping them on their own writing journeys. He is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers and serves as Associate Director of North Texas Christian Writers. He regularly teaches at conferences and workshops, leads writing groups, edits, and mentors and coaches.



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