About Writers On Reading

Welcome to Writers on Reading! You can expect a great author interview every Friday. Plus some fun drawing giveaways you won't want to miss during the month of June! So make sure you enter! Click here for scheduled interviews. Our goal is to present the books writers love, so through their interviews, you can get to know writers as readers too. (And hopefully find new favorites!) I remember a special thrill whenever I heard my favorite writers loved the writers I loved. Here, I hope you'll share my delight of discovery. I am arranging interviews and will soon be listing upcoming guests. If you have a question you'd like asked, or if you'd like to be guest, please use the contact form below. Thanks for visiting!

Friday, 29 January 2016

Writer Amanda Cabot On Reading

Amanda, welcome to Writers on Reading! I confess it is hard to keep
track of your stories! You definitely have a plethora of novels—both historical and contemporary—to your credit, and I must say loved the title and theme of your Paper Roses so much so I had to buy the book instant I first saw it! I think it’s safe to say romance is the abiding theme in your stories. Are you drawn toward the same tender love stories you write? Do you find one theme more repeatedly snags your attention as a read? Is there something special you seek when selecting your next reading adventure?

I’m absolutely delighted that Paper Roses caught your eye! That story holds a special place in my heart. You’re right in thinking that I’m drawn to romances both to read and to write. I love the concept of love conquering all, but more than that, I truly believe in the healing power of love. My favorite stories are those where love heals a wounded hero or heroine … or sometimes both.

Oh, yes, those are the best! So, know that we know what you love to read... What was the most out-of-character book you’ve recently read, and what led to your choice?

Thomas Locke’s Trial Run.  I rarely read thrillers, because they either keep me awake at night or give me nightmares, but this one had such great reviews that I couldn’t resist seeing what all the hype was
about.  I was hooked from the first page, and yes, it did keep me awake at night, turning pages to find out what was going to happen next.  No nightmares, though.  Just hours of riveting reading.
Wow, now there's a recommendation, folks! Amanda, as a writer, you should know better, but as a reader, you know we all do it…so, when did you last “judge a book by the cover”? How did it work out?
I don’t normally read children’s books, but when I saw the cover of The Adventures of Geraldine Woolkins by Karin Kaufman, I was so intrigued that I had to buy it.  I’m happy to report that the story is as good as the cover and, that while it may appear to be a children’s book, it’s an allegory that’s also suitable for adults.

Another good recommendation. So speaking of children's books... were you the kind of kid/teen who loved reading? Which novel do you first remember reading?

I was definitely one of those kids who always, always, always had a book in hand.  As Thomas Jefferson said, “I cannot live without books.”  I can’t remember the first novel I read, but the first one that I read so often that I had whole sections memorized was Little Women.  

My copy's a mess, too! When did you know you wanted to write? Did
any or multiple books influence this desire?

I was about seven when I decided I wanted to be a writer.  That wasn’t based on any one book but rather on the fact that books had the ability to transport me to new and exciting places, to introduce me to people who were braver than I’d ever be, and to show me that happily-ever-after was possible.  Reading brought me so much pleasure that it seemed logical – at least to a seven-year-old – that I should become a writer and bring that same pleasure to others.

What a delightful decision! I'm glad that seven-year-old mind remained undaunted. So one last question, Amanda, with a chilling winter deep upon us, what is on your cozy to-read list? And what is your ideal winter reading experience?

Next on my TBR list is Susan Anne Mason’s A Worthy Heart.  I’m looking forward to reading it on the couch in the family room,
snuggled under a wonderfully warm fleece throw a dear friend made for me, with a cup of cocoa topped with miniature marshmallows at hand.  

Thanks so much for visiting and letting us get to know you better as a reader, Amanda! Folks, you can continue to connect with Beth—and find out more about her Romance books!—at the links below.
BIO:
Amanda Cabot is the bestselling author of more than thirty novels including the Texas Dreams trilogy, the Westward Winds series, the Texas Crossroad trilogy and Christmas Roses. A former director of Information Technology, she has written everything from technical books and articles for IT professionals to mysteries for teenagers and romances for all ages.  Amanda is delighted to now be a fulltime writer of Christian romances, living happily ever after with her husband in
Wyoming.  
PURCHASE AND CONNECTION LINKS:
http://www.amazon.com/Lone-Star-Trail-Novel-Crossroads/dp/0800734335/
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/on-lone-star-trail-amanda-cabot/1122135205?ean=9780800734336
http://www.christianbook.com/new-3-on-lone-star-trail/amanda-cabot/9780800734336/pd/73433product_redirect=1&Ntt=734334&item_code=&Ntk=keywords&event=ESRCP
www.amandacabot.com
https://www.facebook.com/amanda.j.cabot
https://twitter.com/AmandaJoyCabot/
http://amandajoycabot.blogspot.com/
In case you need back cover copy for the current release, On Lone Star  Trail, here it is.
A woman without a future. A man running from the past.
One enchanting place where broken dreams are mended.

If there’s one thing Gillian Hodge never wants to see again, it’s a man
on a motorcycle. Her last encounter with one left her right hand crushed, ending her promising career as a concert pianist. Unsure about the next phase in her life, she heads to Rainbow’s End Resort for some R&R when a sudden thunderstorm causes a motorcycle to crash right in front of her.

When TJ Benjamin’s wife died, he lost more than his best friend; he lost his faith. He has spent the past year wandering the country on his motorcycle, trying not to think about the future. When he finds himself stranded with a busted bike and a reluctant rescuer, he has to wonder about God’s sense of humor.


As these broken people collide, they find that a bright future is still ahead—it just might not be the one they imagined for themselves.